• Russia has its interests in Kessab (video)

    The ruling Republican Party of Armenia (HHK) is not satisfied with the response of the international community to the events in Syria’s Armenian-populated town of Kessab.

    “The brutal events in Kessab are not directed against Armenia, but against humanity. The international community has not given an adequate response to the events,” HHK MP Karen Avagyan told A1+.

    Over 30 organizations in Armenia and Diaspora have initiated a fundraising campaign to help Armenians in Kessab. The results are satisfactory. The organizers have already collected 6 million drams.

     

    Civil groups are also concerned about the response of the international community. Members of the National Values Preservation Front today were at Liberty Square holding posters Save Kessab. One of the passers-by argued with the group members saying the hashtag #SaveKessabhad been linked with false claims and serves the interests of Russia.

    “Russia has a radar center stationed near Kessab. Since they feared that Syrian rebels might attack ad capture the center, they spread rumours that the militants are massacring local Armenians,” said the citizen named Benjamin Hovakimyan.

    The participants of today’s action marched to the government building where the group handed a letter to the executive body. “In the letter we urge the government to take measures for transferring the displaced Kessab Armenians to Armenia,” said Sevan Aghajanyan, head of the initiative.

    Attacks the Syrian Armenian-populated town started on March 21, with al-Qaeda-affiliated militants penetrating from Turkish territory into Kessab. The tragic events of the following days, when the peaceful population became a target of brutal attacks by armed rebels, have raised international concerns. Social networks were immediately filled with petitions to various instances with urges and pleas to “Save Kessab.” About 2000 ethnic Armenians had to flee their homes in Kessab and are currently sheltered in the Armenian Church in Latakia, which is about 60 kilometers to the south of their native town. Part of them wants to resettle in Armenia.

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